bookshelf by year

The Private Life of the Brain: Emotions, Consciousness, and the Secret of the Self

May 13, 2011

The Private Life of the Brain book cover

author |
Susan Greenfield
year published |
2001

Publisher’s Weekly | How are you feeling today? Who might you be? And what do those frequently asked, but profound, questions have to do with each other? An Oxford University brain researcher and the director of Britain’s Royal Institution, Greenfield (Journey to the Centers of the Mind) has entered the crowded field of explain-the-brain books with a sophisticated, memorable and accessible set of arguments.

Other popular… read more

War of the Worldviews: Science Vs. Spirituality

June 30, 2011

War of the Worldviews book cover

author |
Deepak Chopra, Leonard Mlodinow
year published |
2011

Amazon | Two bestselling authors first met in a televised Caltech debate on “the future of God,” one an articulate advocate for spirituality, the other a prominent physicist.  This remarkable book is the product of that serendipitous encounter and the contentious — but respectful — clash of worldviews that grew along with their friendship.

In War of the Worldviews these two great thinkers battle over the cosmos, evolution and… read more

Power, Sex, Suicide: Mitochondria and the Meaning of Life

October 4, 2011

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author |
Nick Lane
year published |
2006

Amazon | If it weren’t for mitochondria, scientists argue, we’d all still be single-celled bacteria. Indeed, these tiny structures inside our cells are important beyond imagining. Without mitochondria, we would have no cell suicide, no sculpting of embryonic shape, no sexes, no menopause, no aging.

In this fascinating and thought-provoking book, Nick Lane brings together the latest research in this exciting field to show how our… read more

A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather than Nothing

February 24, 2012

auniversefromnothing

author |
Lawrence M. Krauss
year published |
2012

Lawrence Krauss’s provocative answers to these and other timeless questions in a wildly popular lecture now on YouTube have attracted almost a million viewers. The last of these questions in particular has been at the center of religious and philosophical debates about the existence of God, and it’s the supposed counterargument to anyone who questions the need for God. As Krauss argues, scientists have, however, historically focused… read more

When I’m 164: The New Science of Radical Life Extension, and What Happens If It Succeeds

September 26, 2012

When I'm 164

author |
David Ewing Duncan
year published |
2012

How long do you want to live, and why? These are the questions that bestselling author (‘Experimental Man’) and science writer David Ewing Duncan explores, with surprising results.

When I’m 164 surveys the increasingly legitimate science of radical life extension — from genetics and regeneration to machine solutions — and considers the pluses and minuses of living to age 164, or beyond: everything from the impact on population… read more

Learning and Memory: A Comprehensive Reference, Four-Volume Set

October 28, 2012

Learning and Memory - A Comprehensive Reference

author |
John H. Byrne
year published |
2008

The study of Learning and Memory is a central topic in Neuroscience and Psychology. It is also a very good example of a field that has come into maturity on all levels – in the protein chemistry and molecular biology of the cellular events underlying learning and memory, the properties and functions of neuronal networks, the psychology and behavioural neuroscience of learning and memory. Many of the basic research… read more

Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior

January 15, 2013
author |
Leonard Mlodinow
year published |
2012

Leonard Mlodinow, the best-selling author of The Drunkard’s Walk and coauthor of The Grand Design (with Stephen Hawking), gives us a startling and eye-opening examination of how the unconscious mind shapes our experience of the world and how, for instance, we often misperceive our relationships with family, friends, and business associates, misunderstand the reasons for our investment decisions, and misremember important events.

Your preference in politicians, the amount you tip your waiter—all… read more

A.I. Apocalypse

September 12, 2013

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author |
William Hertling
year published |
2012

Leon Tsarev is a high school student set on getting into a great college program, until his uncle, a member of the Russian mob, coerces him into developing a new computer virus for the mob’s botnet – the slave army of computers they used to commit digital crimes.

The evolutionary virus Leon creates, based on biological principles, is successful — too successful. All the world’s computers are infected. Everything… read more

Frankenstein’s Cat: Cuddling Up to Biotech’s Brave New Beasts

December 16, 2013

frankensteins_cat_book

author |
Emily Anthes
year published |
2013

One of Nature’s Summer Book Picks
One of Publishers Weekly’s Top Ten Spring 2013 Science Books

For centuries, we’ve toyed with our creature companions, breeding dogs that herd and hunt, housecats that look like tigers, and teacup pigs that fit snugly in our handbags. But what happens when we take animal alteration a step further, engineering a cat that glows green under ultraviolet light or cloning the beloved family Labrador?… read more

Extreme Planets: A Science Fiction Anthology of Alien Worlds

March 19, 2014

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author |
David Conyers, David Kernot, Jeff Harris
year published |
2014

Two decades ago astronomers confirmed the existence of planets orbiting stars other than our Sun. Today more than 800 such worlds have been identified, and scientists now estimate that at least 160 billion star-bound planets are to be found in the Milky Way Galaxy alone. But more surprising is just how diverse and bizarre those worlds are.

Extreme Planets is a science fiction anthology of stories set on… read more

The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution

October 7, 2014

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author |
Walter Isaacson
year published |
2014

Following his blockbuster biography of Steve Jobs, The Innovators is Walter Isaacson’s revealing story of the people who created the computer and the Internet. It is destined to be the standard history of the digital revolution and an indispensable guide to how innovation really happens.

What were the talents that allowed certain inventors and entrepreneurs to turn their visionary ideas into disruptive realities? What led to their creative… read more

TED Talks: The Official TED Guide to Public Speaking

May 6, 2016

TED Talks

author |
Chris Anderson
year published |
2016

For anyone who has ever been inspired by a TED talk…

…this is an insider’s guide to creating talks that are unforgettable.

Since taking over TED in the early 2000s, Chris Anderson has shown how carefully crafted short talks can be the key to unlocking empathy, stirring excitement, spreading knowledge, and promoting a shared dream. Done right, a talk can electrify a room and transform an audience’s… read more

Scale: The Universal Laws of Growth, Innovation, Sustainability, and the Pace of Life in Organisms, Cities, Economies, and Companies

May 15, 2017

scale-cover

author |
Geoffrey West
year published |
2017

West, a theoretical physicist and former president of the Santa Fe Institute, argues in this dense yet accessible work that there are simple laws that underlie all complex systems, whether organic entities or human constructs. Animals, plants, economies, cultures, cities, and companies are united by the fact that they come into existence, grow, mature, and decline. West’s central conceit in studying these phenomena is scaling: how a system changes… read more

Operators and Promoters: The Story of Molecular Biology and Its Creators

April 9, 2009
author |
Harrison G. Echols
year published |
2001

During the past four decades, molecular biology has dominated the life sciences. Curiously, no participant in this scientific revolution has previously attempted a book-length history of the development of this powerful science. Harrison (“Hatch”) Echols provides such an account in Operators and Promoters. A gifted molecular biologist and talented raconteur, Echols relates the intellectual history of the most influential discoveries in molecular biology from his own experiences.… read more

Global Brain: The Evolution of Mass Mind from the Big Bang to the 21st Century

January 18, 2010
author |
Howard Bloom
year published |
2001

Publishers Weekly | Bloom’s debut, The Lucifer Principle (1997), sought the biological basis for human evil. Now Bloom is after even bigger game. While cyber-thinkers claim the Internet is bringing us toward some sort of worldwide mind, Bloom believes we’ve had one all along. Drawing on information theory, debates within evolutionary biology, and research psychology (among other disciplines), Bloom understands the development of life on Earth as a series… read more

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