Recently Added by year publishedBy Author | A-Z

Consciousness: Confessions of a Romantic Reductionist

April 30, 2012

consciousness

author |
Christof Koch
year published |
2012

Amazon | What links conscious experience of pain, joy, color, and smell to bioelectrical activity in the brain? How can anything physical give rise to nonphysical, subjective, conscious states? Christof Koch has devoted much of his career to bridging the seemingly unbridgeable gap between the physics of the brain and phenomenal experience. This engaging book — part scientific overview, part memoir, part futurist speculation — describes Koch’s search for an empirical explanation… read more

Lynn Margulis: The Life and Legacy of a Scientific Rebel

September 5, 2012
author |
Dorion Sagan
year published |
2012

Tireless, controversial, and hugely inspirational to those who knew her or encountered her work, Lynn Margulis was a scientist whose intellectual energy and interests knew no bounds. Best known for her work on the origins of eukaryotic cells, the Gaia hypothesis, and symbiogenesis as a driving force in evolution, her work has forever changed the way we understand life on Earth.

When Margulis passed away in… read more

Stones of Significance

October 26, 2012

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author |
David Brin
year published |
2011

Heard of the “singularity”? A time of transition that some perceive just ahead of us, when our skill and knowledge and immense computing power transform us into… well… godlike beings? An immense topic! But from a writer’s perspective, it presents a problem. One can write stories leading up to the singularity, about all the problems. (Little things like rebellious AI.) But how do you write a tale set AFTER… read more

Engineering the Next Revolution in Neuroscience: The New Science of Experiment Planning

August 13, 2013

Engineering the next rev in neuro

author |
Alcino J. Silva, Anthony Landreth, John Bickle
year published |
2013

Science is growing at a pace that exceeds our comprehension. This is no less true of neuroscience than any other discipline. Ambiguity about what is known and what has been disproven confounds researchers and hampers research planning. There are simply too many research articles and too few hours in the day for anyone to read all that is relevant, let alone distinguish the reliable results from the sketchy ones.… read more

The Dumbest Generation: How the Digital Age Stupefies Young Americans and Jeopardizes Our Future (Or, Don’t Trust Anyone Under 30)

February 21, 2014

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author |
Mark Bauerlein
year published |
2008

For decades, concern has been brewing about the dumbed-down popular culture of young people and the impact it has on their futures.

The dawn of the digital age once aroused our hopes: the Internet, e-mail, blogs, and interactive and ultra-realistic video games promised to yield a generation of sharper, more aware, and intellectually sophisticated children. The terms “information superhighway” and “knowledge economy” entered the lexicon, and we assumed… read more

Invisible: The Dangerous Allure of the Unseen

July 21, 2014

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author |
Philip Ball
year published |
2014

If you could be invisible, what would you do? The chances are that it would have something to do with power, wealth or sex. Perhaps all three.

But there’s no need to feel guilty. Impulses like these have always been at the heart of our fascination with invisibility: it points to realms beyond our senses, serves as a receptacle for fears and dreams, and hints at worlds where… read more

Carry On: Sound Advice from Schneier on Security

January 2, 2015

Carry On

author |
Bruce Schneier
year published |
2014

Up-to-the-minute observations from a world-famous security expert

Bruce Schneier is known worldwide as the foremost authority and commentator on every security issue from cyber-terrorism to airport surveillance. This groundbreaking book features more than 160 commentaries on recent events including the Boston Marathon bombing, the NSA’s ubiquitous surveillance programs, Chinese cyber-attacks, the privacy of cloud computing, and how to hack the Papal election. Timely as an Internet news report and… read more

2015–16 State of the Future

September 23, 2015

2015-16 State Of Future

author |
Jerome C. Glenn, Elizabeth Florescu
year published |
2015

The 2015-16 State of the Future is a compelling overview of humanity’s present situation, challenges and opportunities, potentials for the future, and actions and policies that could improve humanity’s outlook — in clear, precise, and readable text with unparalleled breadth and depth.

This is the 18th and best edition of the State of the Future produced by The Millennium Project with its 56… read more

The Survivors Club: The Secrets and Science that Could Save Your Life

July 14, 2010

The Survivors Club: The Secrets and Science that Could Save Your Life

author |
Ben Sherwood
year published |
2010

Amazon | Sherwood (The Man Who Ate the 747), a writer for the L.A. Times, travels worldwide to gain insight from people who have survived a slew of near fatal phenomena ranging from a mountain lion attack to a Holocaust concentration camp, and interviewing an array of experts to understand the psychology, genetics and jumble of other little things that determines whether we live or die. Readers curious about… read more

A Cosmist Manifesto: Practical Philosophy for the Posthuman Age

July 22, 2010

A Cosmist Manifesto: Practical Philosophy for the Posthuman Age

author |
Ben Goertzel
year published |
2010

Amazon | The term Cosmism was introduced by Tsiolokovsky and other Russian Cosmists around 1900. Goertzel’s “Cosmist Manifesto” gives it new life and a new twist for the 21st century. Cosmism, as Goertzel presents it, is a practical philosophy for the posthuman era. Rooted in Western and Eastern philosophy as well as modern technology and science, it is a way of understanding ourselves and our universe that makes sense… read more

Build Your Own All-Terrain Robot

February 7, 2011

buildyourownallterrainrobot

author |
Brad Graham, Kathy McGowan
year published |
2004

Want to build a heavy duty wheelchair sized robot? This book gives instructions on how to build the kind of robot you might have found in the back room of NASA’s intelligent mechanisms lab. This book gives instructions for adapting a wheelchair motor and square tube frame system to explore the outside world. The bot is remote controlled and has video feed.

The New Cool: A Visionary Teacher, His FIRST Robotics Team, and the Ultimate Battle of Smarts

March 30, 2011

The New Cool book cover

author |
Neal Bascomb
year published |
2011

Amazon | That Monday afternoon, in high-school gyms across America, kids were battling for the only glory American culture seems to want to dispense to the young these days: sports glory. But at Dos Pueblos High School in Goleta, California, in a gear-cluttered classroom, a different type of “cool” was brewing.  A physics teacher with a dream — the first public high-school teacher ever to win a MacArthur… read more

The Private Life of the Brain: Emotions, Consciousness, and the Secret of the Self

May 13, 2011

The Private Life of the Brain book cover

author |
Susan Greenfield
year published |
2001

Publisher’s Weekly | How are you feeling today? Who might you be? And what do those frequently asked, but profound, questions have to do with each other? An Oxford University brain researcher and the director of Britain’s Royal Institution, Greenfield (Journey to the Centers of the Mind) has entered the crowded field of explain-the-brain books with a sophisticated, memorable and accessible set of arguments.

Other popular… read more

War of the Worldviews: Science Vs. Spirituality

June 30, 2011

War of the Worldviews book cover

author |
Deepak Chopra, Leonard Mlodinow
year published |
2011

Amazon | Two bestselling authors first met in a televised Caltech debate on “the future of God,” one an articulate advocate for spirituality, the other a prominent physicist.  This remarkable book is the product of that serendipitous encounter and the contentious — but respectful — clash of worldviews that grew along with their friendship.

In War of the Worldviews these two great thinkers battle over the cosmos, evolution and… read more

Power, Sex, Suicide: Mitochondria and the Meaning of Life

October 4, 2011

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author |
Nick Lane
year published |
2006

Amazon | If it weren’t for mitochondria, scientists argue, we’d all still be single-celled bacteria. Indeed, these tiny structures inside our cells are important beyond imagining. Without mitochondria, we would have no cell suicide, no sculpting of embryonic shape, no sexes, no menopause, no aging.

In this fascinating and thought-provoking book, Nick Lane brings together the latest research in this exciting field to show how our… read more

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