bookshelf by year

Thunder Dog: The True Story of a Blind Man, His Guide Dog, and the Triumph of Trust at Ground Zero

January 20, 2012

ThunderDog-FINAL

author |
Michael Hingson
year published |
2011

Amazon |  A blind man and his guide dog show the power of trust and courage in the midst of devastating terror.

It was 12:30 a.m. on 9/11 and Roselle whimpered at Michael’s bedside. A thunderstorm was headed east, and she could sense the distant rumbles while her owners slept. As a trained guide dog, when she was “on the clock” nothing could faze her. But that morning,… read more

Maker City: A Practical Guide for Reinventing American Cities

March 10, 2017

maker-city-cover

author |
Peter Hirshberg, Dale Dougherty, Marcia Kadanoff
year published |
2016

Maker City: A Practical Guide for Reinventing American Cities is a comprehensive case studies and how-to information useful for city leaders, civic innovators, nonprofits, and others engaged in urban economic development. Maker City: A Practical Guide for Reinventing American Cities is committed to going beyond stories to find patterns and discern promising practices to help city leaders make even more informed decisions.

Maker City: A Practical Guide for Reinventing Americanread more

Maker City: A Practical Guide for Reinventing Our Cities

October 25, 2016

maker-city-cover

author |
Peter Hirshberg, Dale Dougherty, Marcia Kadanoff
year published |
2016

Maker City, or the Maker City Playbook is a comprehensive set of case studies and how-to information useful for city leaders, civic innovators, nonprofits, and others engaged in urban economic development. The Maker City Playbook is committed to going beyond stories to find patterns and discern promising practices to help city leaders make even more informed decisions.

  • Chapter 1: Introduction and a Call to Action
  • Chapter 2: The Maker

read more

Alan Turing: The Enigma — The Book That Inspired the Film ‘The Imitation Game’

November 30, 2014

Alan_Turing_The_Enigma

author |
Andrew Hodges
year published |
2014

Alan Turing died in 1954, but the themes of his life epitomize the turn of the millennium. A pure mathematician from a tradition that prided itself on its impracticality, Turing laid the foundations for modern computer science, writes Andrew Hodges: Alan had proved that there was no “miraculous machine” that could solve all mathematical problems, but in the process he had discovered something almost equally miraculous, the idea of a universal… read more

Landscape of the Mind: Human Evolution and the Archaeology of Thought

April 21, 2011

Landscape of the Mind book cover

author |
John F. Hoffecker
year published |
2011

Amazon | John F. Hoffecker explores the origin and growth of the mind, drawing on information from the human fossil record, archaeology, and history. Hoffecker argues that, as an indirect result of bipedal locomotion, early humans developed a feedback relationship among their hands, brains, and tools, evolving the capacity to externalize thoughts in the form of shaped stone objects. When anatomically modern humans evolved a parallel capacity to… read more

I Am a Strange Loop

May 4, 2011

I am a Strange Loop book cover

author |
Douglas R. Hofstadter
year published |
2008

Amazon | Can thought arise out of matter? Can self, soul, consciousness, “I” arise out of mere matter? If it cannot, then how can you or I be here?

I Am a Strange Loop argues that the key to understanding selves and consciousness is the “strange loop” — a special kind of abstract feedback loop inhabiting our brains. The most central and complex symbol in your brain is… read more

The Scientific American Brave New Brain

January 6, 2011

SAbravenewbrain

author |
Judith Horstman, Scientific American
year published |
2010

Amazon | This fascinating and highly accessible book presents fantastic but totally feasible projections of what your brain may be capable of in the near future. It shows how scientific breakthroughs and amazing research are turning science fiction into science fact. In this brave new book, you’ll explore:

        • How partnerships between biological sciences and technology are

read more

Whiplash: How to Survive Our Faster Future

December 30, 2016

Whiplash

author |
Joi Ito and Jeff Howe
year published |
2016

“The future,” as the author William Gibson once noted, “is already here. It’s just unevenly distributed.” Whiplash is a postcard from that future.

The world is more complex and volatile today than at any other time in our history. The tools of our modern existence are getting faster, cheaper, and smaller at an exponential rate, just as billions of strangers around the world are suddenly just one click or… read more

Return To The Garden

October 1, 2012

ReturnToTheGarden

author |
Norie Huddle
year published |
2012

RETURN TO THE GARDEN is the first novel in a series called “The Eleanor Chronicles” that Norie Huddle is writing to introduce almost 45 years of her research and thinking about practical ways to transform human civilization so that we may survive and thrive.

Luis Alvarez, a young Ecuadorian man, meets an older North American woman named simply “Eleanor” on a long bus ride in Ecuador. They have a… read more

Citizen Cyborg: Why Democratic Societies Must Respond to the Redesigned Human of the Future

July 16, 2010

Citizen Cyborg: Why Democratic Societies Must Respond to the Redesigned Human of the Future

author |
James Hughes
year published |
2004

Amazon | In the next fifty years, life spans will extend well beyond a century. Our senses and cognition will be enhanced. We will have greater control over our emotions and memory. Our bodies and brains will be surrounded by and merged with computer power. The limits of the human body will be transcended as technologies such as artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, and genetic engineering converge and accelerate. With them,… read more

Smarter: The New Science of Building Brain Power

November 5, 2013

Smarter

author |
Dan Hurley
year published |
2013

Can you make yourself, your kids, and your parents smarter?

Expanding upon one of the most-read New York Times Magazine features of 2012, Smarter penetrates the hot new field of intelligence research to reveal what researchers call a revolution in human intellectual abilities. Shattering decades of dogma, scientists began publishing studies in 2008 showing that “fluid intelligence”—the ability to learn, solve novel problems, and get to the heart of things—can be increased… read more

Brave New World

December 18, 2013

BraveNewWorld_FirstEdition

author |
Aldous Huxley
year published |
2006

A towering classic of dystopian satire, BRAVE NEW WORLD is a brilliant and terrifying vision of a soulless society—and of one man who discovers the human costs of mindless conformity.

Hundreds of years in the future, the World Controllers have created an ideal civilization. Its members, shaped by genetic engineering and behavioral conditioning, are productive and content in roles they have been assigned at conception. Government-sanctioned drugs and recreational… read more

Brave New World Revisited

October 13, 2013

Brave-New-World-Revisited

author |
Aldous Huxley
year published |
2006

When the novel Brave New World first appeared in 1932, its shocking analysis of a scientific dictatorship seemed a projection into the remote future. Here, in one of the most important and fascinating books of his career, Aldous Huxley uses his tremendous knowledge of human relations to compare the modern-day world with his prophetic fantasy. He scrutinizes threats to humanity, such as overpopulation, propaganda, and chemical persuasion, and explains why we… read more

Mirroring People: The New Science of How We Connect with Others

July 20, 2010

Mirroring People: The New Science of How We Connect with Others

author |
Marco Iacoboni
year published |
2008

How do we know what others are thinking and feeling? Why do we weep at movies? UCLA neuroscientist Iacoboni introduces readers to the world of mirror neurons and what they imply about human empathy, which, the author says, underlies morality. Mirror neurons allow us to interpret facial expressions of pain or joy and respond appropriately. Thanks to these neurons, Iacoboni writes, [w]e have empathy for… fictional characters—we know how… read more

Smart Machines: IBM’s Watson and the Era of Cognitive Computing

October 18, 2013

Smart machines

author |
John E. Kelly III, Steve Hamm
year published |
2013

We are crossing a new frontier in the evolution of computing and entering the era of cognitive systems. The victory of IBM’s Watson on the television quiz show Jeopardy! revealed how scientists and engineers at IBM and elsewhere are pushing the boundaries of science and technology to create machines that sense, learn, reason, and interact with people in new ways to provide insight and advice.

In Smart Machines, John E. Kelly… read more

close and return to Home