Alpha Go defeats world’s top Go player. What’s next?

Game 3 of The Ultimate Go Challenge

3D-printed ‘bionic skin’ could give robots and prosthetics the sense of touch

Could also be printed directly on human skin for pulse monitoring or as a human-machine interface --- imagine a computer mouse built into your fingertip

A one-of-a-kind 3D printer built at the University of Minnesota can print touch sensors directly on a model hand. Credit: Shuang-Zhuang Guo and Michael McAlpine, University of Minnesota, "3D Printed Stretchable Tactile Sensors," Advanced Materials. 2017. (credit: Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. )

Do robots creep you out?

Roboticists attempt to find out which presentation method presents the lowest barrier to communication

robot vr

How Google’s ‘smart reply’ is getting smarter

A significant new hierarchical approach to machine intelligence

Can't make it

‘Wearable’ PET brain scanner enables studies of moving patients

Seeing more deeply into the brain in real time

When AI improves human performance instead of taking over

The game results show that placing slightly “noisy” bots in a central location (high-degree nodes) improve human coordination by reducing same-color neighbor nodes. Square nodes show the bots and round nodes show human players; red edges show color conflicts, which are reduced with bot participation. (credit: Hirokazu Shirado and Nicholas A. Christakis/Nature)

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