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‘World’s fattest mouse’ appears immune to diabetes

August 24, 2007
(Image: Ja-Young Kim/Dave Gresham)

The “world’s fattest mice,” genetically engineered to overproduce a key hormone, weigh five times as much as normal mice do, but bizarrely do not develop diabetes, reveals a new study by University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center scientists.

The findings shed light on how current diabetes medications work and point to new drug targets to treat the disease, say the study’s researchers.

World’s fastest transistor operates at blinding speed

April 12, 2005

The world’s fastest transistor has been developed by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers.

The prototype bipolar junction transistor has a maximum operating speed of 604 GHz, meaning it can carry out 604 billion operations per second.

World’s Fastest Oscillating Nanomachine Holds Promise For Telecommunications, Quantum Computing

February 18, 2005

Boston University physicists have developed a nanomechanical oscillator that oscillates at 1.49 gigahertz, making it the fastest moving nanostructure yet created.

The technology could help further miniaturize wireless communication devices. It is also the largest structure (10.7 microns long and 400 nm wide) to monitor quantum mechanical movements.

Boston University news release

World’s fastest organic transistor could lead to low-cost transparent electronics

January 10, 2014

transparent - featured

Engineers from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) and Stanford University have created thin-film organic transistors that could operate more than five times faster than previous examples of this experimental technology, with the potential to achieve a new generation of cheap, transparent devices such as high-resolution television screens and sensor arrays.

For years, engineers have been trying to use inexpensive, carbon-rich molecules and plastics to create organic semiconductors… read more

World’s Fastest Computer Gets Even Faster

November 14, 2005

The IBM Blue Gene/L supercomputer, which operates at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California, has doubled its performance to 280.6 trillion calculations a second (teraflops), up from 136.8 teraflops from the list released in June.

The system is used to study the United States nuclear stockpile and perform other research.

World’s fastest computer boots up

August 20, 2001

IBM has switched on the world’s most powerful computer, ASCI White, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It is the first computer capable of more than 10 trillion calculations per second and 1,000 times faster than IBM’s Deep Blue.

World’s fastest camera detects rogue cancer cells in real time

New blood-screening technology boasts a throughput of 100,000 cells per second
July 7, 2012

world's_fastest_camera

A new optical microscope developed by UCLA engineers could make it easier to distinguish and isolate rare cells from among a large population of assorted cells for early detection of disease and for monitoring disease treatments.

“To catch these elusive cells, the camera must be able to capture and digitally process millions of images continuously at a very high frame rate [36.7 MHz],” said Bahram Jalali, who holds… read more

World’s data will grow by 50X in next decade, IDC study predicts

June 29, 2011

storage_exabytes

In 2011, the amount of information created and replicated will surpass 1.8 zettabytes (1.8 trillion gigabytes), growing by a factor of 9 in just five years, according to the fifth annual IDC Digital Universe study released Tuesday.

By 2020 the world will generate 50 times the amount of information and 75 times the number of “information containers” while IT staff to manage it will grow less than 1.5… read more

World’s communications network due an energy diet

January 13, 2010

The Internet and other communications networks could use one-ten-thousandth of the energy that they do today if smarter data-coding techniques were used to move information around, say Bell Labs researchers, who have launched a consortium of networking and computing firms called Green Touch that is committed to developing new power-saving technologies.

World’s business servers process 9.57 zettabyes a year

May 10, 2011

The annual amount of business-related information processed by the world’s computer servers is 9.57 zettabytes (9.57×10^21 bytes) per year, scientists at the University of California, San Diego have estimated.

This is the digital equivalent of a 5.6-billion-mile-high stack of books from Earth to Neptune and back to Earth, repeated about 20 times a year. The report complements an earlier report on information consumption, which
estimated… read more

World’s biggest geoengineering experiment ‘violates’ UN rules

October 17, 2012

Geoengineering with bloom : high concentrations of chlorophyll in the Eastern Gulf of Alaska

Controversial U.S. businessman’s iron fertilization off west coast of Canada contravenes two UN conventions.

Russ George, a controversial California businessman, dumped about 100 tons of iron sulphate into the Pacific Ocean as part of a geoengineering scheme off the west coast of Canada in July, a Guardian investigation reveals.

Lawyers, environmentalists and civil… read more

World’s Best Microscope Can Produce Images Less Than Diameter Of Single Hydrogen Atom

January 24, 2008

TEAM 0.5, the world’s most powerful transmission electron microscope — capable of producing images with half‑angstrom resolution, less than the diameter of a single hydrogen atom — has been installed at the Department of Energy’s National Center for Electron Microscopy at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

World’s Best Medical Care?

August 13, 2007

Many Americans are under the delusion that we have “the best health care system in the world,” as President Bush sees it.

That may be true at many top medical centers. But the disturbing truth is that this country lags well behind other advanced nations in delivering timely and effective care.

World Wide Wellness: Online Database Keeps Tabs on Emerging Health Threats

July 9, 2008

Researchers at Children’s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School have developed “HealthMap,” an automated data-mining project that searches web-accessible information sources to track emerging health threats worldwide.

HealthMap can often detect potential disease outbreaks in local pockets before health agencies such as the World Health Organization and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) realize they’re threats.

It collects an average of 300 reports per day… read more

World stock markets sink on US, Europe worries

May 18, 2012

450px-New_York_City_Stock_Exchange_NYSE_03

World stocks fell Friday after credit downgrades slapped on Spanish banks unnerved investors already worried about the stability of the 17-country euro currency union.

Political turmoil in Greece has increased the likelihood that it could leave the 17-country monetary union, a move that could have ripple effects throughout Europe and the world’s financial markets.

Markets were jolted by Moody’s downgrade Thursday of 16 Spanish banks, said Jackson Wong,… read more

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