Most Recently Added Most commentedBy Title | Z-A

Web browser pioneer backs new way to surf Net

November 10, 2010

A new browser called RockMelt is built on the premise that most online activity today revolves around socializing on Facebook, searching on Google, tweeting on Twitter and monitoring a handful of favorite websites.

Rockmelt tries to minimize the need to roam from one website to the next by corralling all vital information and favorite services in panes and drop-down windows.

Web Apps Meet Consumer Electronics at CES

January 8, 2010

A big trend emerging at CES: web applications like Pandora, Napster, iTunes being ported to consumer electronics, from the technology inside cars to Web-enabled TVs.

Web apps for bioinformatics

JavaScript apps to improve diagnostic accuracy, health-care delivery, and research-data sharing
July 24, 2012

imagejs_greg_almeida_web

A University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) team has developed ImageJS, a free app system that analyzes tissue images.

The ImageJS module enables pathologists to drag a digitized pathology slide into a Web app and analyze it for malignancy based on color. Cancer cells change color when exposed to standard dyes. It is available from the Google Chrome App storeGoogle Code and Github.

ImageJS… read more

Web accessibility soon mandatory in Europe?

June 18, 2006

The 25 European Commission member states and nine accession countries have all signed up for an “Internet for all” action plan, designed to ensure that the most Web-disadvantaged groups can get online.

The EC has pledged to increase broadband coverage across the continent to 90 percent by 2010 and to halve exclusion rates in skills and digital literacy by 2010.

Weaving Batteries into Clothes

October 9, 2007

A new machine that makes nanostructured fibers could turn soldiers’ uniforms into power supplies.

Among the machine’s many potential uses is assembling fibers in regular, nanoscale patterns that combine battery electrodes with a polymer separator and electrolyte to form a complete battery.

Wearing your computer on your sleeve

December 19, 2011

Over the last year, Apple and Google have secretly begun working on projects that will become wearable computers, based on the smartphone, which is becoming the hub for our information sharing and gathering, New York Times Bits reports.

In Google’s secret Google X labs, researchers are working on peripherals that — when attached to your clothing or body — would communicate information back to an … read more

Wearing a computer is good for you

May 15, 2012

(credit: iBGStar)

Fitness trends and health-care problems are creating demand for tiny computers we won’t even notice we’re carrying.

What if your doctor had already received the information from a tiny device built into your cell phone, wallet, or undershirt? Sonny Vu, a cofounder of the medical-device company AgaMatrix, believes a device like this could fundamentally change health care.

He created the first FDA-approved glucose sensor that plugs into an iPhone;… read more

Wearable Wireless Displays Are In Sight

May 13, 2004
A "heads up" display from MicroOptical

Tiny wearable screens–with diagonals of less than half an inch–are now available that project what looks like a lifesize screen floating in space just a couple of feet from your eyes.

These devices permit the wearer to remain totally engaged with their environment, able to see everything around them.

Future screens won’t stick out, but rather will be embedded into the frames and will be wirelessly connected to… read more

Wearable silicon solar cells may soon become possible

December 7, 2012

A coiled strand of a meter-long solar-cell junction fiber, thinner than the width of a human hair, which has been created by a team of chemists, physicists, and engineers led by John Badding at Penn State University (credit: Badding lab/Penn State)

A silicon-based optical fiber with solar-cell capabilities has been developed, scalable to many meters in length. The research may allow for weaving together solar-cell silicon wires to create flexible, curved, or twisted solar fabrics.

The findings by an international team of chemists, physicists, and engineers, led by John Badding, a professor of chemistry at Penn State University, build on earlier work addressing the… read more

Wearable sensor reveals what overwhelms you

March 3, 2011

(Credit: Affectiva)

The Q Sensor, a device made by Affectiva, constantly checks for signs of anxiety, indicated by skin conductance. A USB cable connects to a computer to analyze the data.

Wearable scanner opens new frontier in neuroscience

March 17, 2011

A rat's head fits in the circular opening of this device, which is surrounded by miniaturized detectors and electronics  (photo credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory)

A tiny wearable positron emission tomography (PET) scanner has been used to track chemical activity in the brains of unrestrained animals while an animal behaves naturally; it could be modified for people.

By revealing neurological circuitry as the subjects perform normal tasks, researchers say, the technology could greatly broaden the understanding of learning, addiction, depression, and other conditions.

A conventional PET scanner is so large that these studies… read more

‘Wearable robot’ arm improves performance of brain-controlled device

December 15, 2010

Aided by a robotic exoskeleton, a monkey can hit the target faster and more directly (Hatsopoulos, et al. The Journal of Neuroscience)

The performance of a brain-machine interface designed to help paralyzed subjects move objects with their thoughts is improved with the addition of a robotic arm that provides sensory feedback, a new study from the University of Chicago finds.

Devices that translate brain activity into the movement of a computer cursor or an external robotic arm have already proven successful in humans. But in these early systems, vision was the… read more

Wearable projection system turns any surface into a multitouch interface

October 18, 2011

Omni Touch2

OmniTouch, a wearable projection system developed by researchers at Microsoft Research and Carnegie Mellon University, lets you turn pads of paper, walls, or even your own hands, arms, and legs into graphical, interactive surfaces.

OmniTouch uses a depth-sensing camera, similar to the Microsoft Kinect, to track your fingers on everyday surfaces. You control interactive applications by tapping or dragging your fingers. The projector… read more

Wearable ‘neurocam’ records scenes when it detects user interest

February 10, 2014

Neuroware

Keio University scientists have developed a “neurocam” — a wearable camera system that detects emotions, based on an analysis of the user’s brainwaves.

The hardware is a combination of Neurosky’s Mind Wave Mobile and a customized brainwave sensor.

The algorithm is based on measures of “interest” and “like” developed by Professor Mitsukura and the neurowear team.

The users interests are quantified… read more

Wearable muscle suit makes heavy lifting a cinch

April 23, 2012

sayarobot

Hiroshi Kobayashi’s team at the Tokyo University of Science in Japan has developed a series of cybernetic exoskeletons.

Scheduled for commercial release early next year, a wearable robot takes two forms: one augmenting the arms and back that is aimed at areas of commerce where heavy lifting is required; and a lighter, 5 kg version that will target the nursing industry to assist in lifting people in and… read more

close and return to Home