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Verizon Goes Up & Down at 10 Gbps in Tests

October 27, 2010

Verizon said Tuesday it had conducted a successful trial of 10 gigabit per second connections on both the download side and on the upload side, pioneering a new technology called XG-PON to make such speeds happen.

Verizon is offering a platform that’s not only competitive to cable broadband for consumers, but will become a platform for innovation for businesses now operating in the “cloud.”

Venture for Sharing Wi-Fi Draws Big-Name Backers

February 6, 2006

A “global network of shared Wi-Fi connections” will allow users of Wi-Fi wireless technology to connect to the Internet at many physical locations, in contrast to the limited access available now.

The “Fon” network, backed by Google, Skype, and two venture-capital firms, is operating in Europe, and plans call for expanding it into the United States and other countries this year.

Venture Capitalists Want to Put Some Algae in Your Tank

March 7, 2007

United States venture capital flowing into clean energy leapfrogged to more than $2.4 billion in 2006, well more than double that invested in 2005, and more than triple from 2004.

The ascent of venture capital in renewable energy has reminded some Silicon Valley venture capitalists of the early flow of money into the Internet in the mid-1990s.

Venture capitalist: We need to prepare for artificial intelligence

September 7, 2007

Q: What do people most misunderstand about the idea of singularity?

A: I don’t think they understand how radically different the world will be in 30 or 40 years, and there are choices that we need to make today to shape the future. – Peter Thiel, a venture capitalist who co-founded PayPal and speaker at the Singularity Summit this weekend.

Venture Capital Rushes Into Alternative Energy

April 30, 2007

Money is flowing into alternative energy companies so fast that “the warning signs of a bubble are appearing,” according to a report on investment in clean technology by a New York research firm, Lux Research.

The report also suggests that companies that make equipment to cleanse air or water, or that process waste, have been overlooked by investors.

The initial public offerings were primarily in companies involved in… read more

Venter to Bio World: Exa-Byte Me

November 13, 2002

Craig Venter, delivering the opening address yesterday at the BioITWorld conference here, said that computer power will be the limiting factor in crunching, storing, and manipulating the data necessary for linking the promise of genomics to insights into gene function, protein interaction, and personalized medicine. To underscore his point, he said the Celera computers that sequenced the human genome – the 1.5 teraflop, 120 terabyte machines that took up 6,000… read more

Venter Takes Step Toward Synthetic Cells

July 3, 2007

Moving a step closer to making cells from scratch, a team at the J. Craig Venter Institute took all of the genes from one species of bacteria, Mycoplasma mycoides, and transferred them into another, Mycoplasma capricolum.

The result: The genes from the mycoides took over, changing the cells from one species to another simply by moving around DNA.

Researchers hope that custom-engineered cells could be useful in producing… read more

vCJD may lurk in more people than realised

May 22, 2006

The deadly human form of mad cow disease, vCJD, may have infected far more people than previously thought, suggests a new study in the British Medical Journal.

Variant Creutzfelt-Jakob disease is linked to eating meat infected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), also known as mad-cow disease. A rogue version of a prion protein proliferates in the brain, leading to distressing mental deterioration, loss of motor control, and eventually death.

Vast Spy System Loots Computers in 103 Countries

March 29, 2009

A vast electronic spying operation has infiltrated computers and has stolen documents from hundreds of government and private offices around the world, University of Toronto researchers have found.

Vapor nanobubbles rapidly detect malaria through the skin

One portable device able to screen up to 200,000 people per year, operated by non-medical personnel
January 2, 2014

nanobubble_malaria

Rice University researchers have developed a noninvasive technology that accurately detects even a single malaria-infected cell among a million normal cells through the skin in seconds with a laser scanner.

The “vapor nanobubble” technology requires no dyes or diagnostic chemicals, there is no need to draw blood, and there are zero false-positive readings.

The diagnosis and screening will be supported by a low-cost, battery-powered portable device that… read more

Vanishing Gas Confirms Black Hole Event Horizons

January 12, 2006
 Animation of a neutron star X-ray burst. (NASA)

A type of X-ray explosion found on neutron stars does not occur near black holes, scientists announced at the 207th meeting of the American Astronomical Society.

The lack of explosions is strong evidence for the existence of a black hole event horizon, a theoretical boundary into which matter vanishes and cannot escape.

“By looking at objects that pull in gas, we can infer whether that gas… read more

Value of Cholesterol Targets Is Disputed

October 18, 2006

A paper published in the Oct. 3 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine says there is not enough solid scientific evidence to support the target numbers (less than 100, less than 70 for high-risk patients) for LDL cholesterol set forth by the National Cholesterol Education Program.

Vaccine triggers immune response, prevents Alzheimer’s in mice

May 27, 2008

University of Rochester Medical Center scientists have created a vaccine that prevents the development of Alzheimer’s disease-like symptoms in mice without causing inflammation or significant side effects.

They used a herpes virus container (stripped of its viral genes) loaded with the genetic code for amyloid beta and interleukin-4 (a protein that stimulates immune responses).

The vaccinated mice generated an immune response to amyloid-beta peptide (a protein that accumulates… read more

Vaccine for Ebola virus developed

March 31, 2008

An international team of researchers used recombinant DNA techniques to make an Ebola vaccine that is effective in non-human primates.

Vaccines for viruses like Ebola, Marburg and Lassa fever have been difficult to produce because simple “killed” viruses, which just trigger an antibody response from the blood, are not effective and because only a small number of facilities can conduct research on Biosafety Level 4 threats.… read more

V-shaped solar cells could lead to better efficiency

December 24, 2007

Stanford University scientists have found that v-shaped thin-film solar cells increase efficiency by more than 50 percent, which may make it possible to increase the use of organic solar cells for large-scale energy generation.

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