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Almaden Institute’s ‘Cognitive Computing’ videos available online

June 5, 2006

Videos and presentations are now available online for IBM Almaden Institute’s 2006 “Cognitive Computing” conference, which examined scientific and technological issues around the quest to understand how the human brain works and how and when can we mechanize cognition.

Speakers included Toby Berger (Cornell), Gerald Edelman (The Neurosciences Institute), Joaquin Fuster (UCLA), Jeff Hawkins (Palm/Numenta), Robert Hecht-Nielsen (UCSD), Christof Koch (CalTech), Henry Markram (EPFL/BlueBrain), V. S. Ramachandran… read more

Almost Human, and Sometimes Smarter

April 17, 2007

Chimps display a remarkable range of behavior and talent. They make and use simple tools, hunt in groups and engage in aggressive, violent acts. They are social creatures that appear to be capable of empathy, altruism, self-awareness, cooperation in problem solving and learning through example and experience. Chimps even outperform humans in some memory tasks.

Alpha Lipoic acid explored as an anti-aging compound

May 22, 2007

Researchers have identified the mechanism of action of lipoic acid, a remarkable compound that in animal experiments appears to slow down the process of aging, improve blood flow, enhance immune function and perform many other functions.

ALS patient hopes to be cryopreserved

By Christine Gaspar
June 17, 2013

Aaron Winborn

I would like to introduce you to Aaron Winborn. It was his birthday this week. He just turned 46.

He has a wife named Gwen, a daughter Ashlin, age 9, and another daughter Sabina, age 3. He is an open-source software developer, author of the book Drupal Multimedia, and community activist.

At the age of 43, he was diagnosed with an aggressive form of… read more

Altering stem cells to make growth factors needed for replacement tissue inside the body

February 21, 2014

stem_cells_scaffold

By combining a synthetic scaffolding material with gene delivery techniques to direct stem cells into becoming new cartilage, Duke University researchers are getting closer to being able to generate replacement cartilage where it’s needed in the body.

Performing tissue repair with stem cells typically requires applying copious amounts of growth factor proteins — a task that is very expensive and becomes challenging once the developing material is… read more

Alternate Reality Games Grab Mindshare

March 17, 2003

ARGs or Alternate Reality Games are immersive experiences that mix real world clues, phone calls, voicemail, email chatterbots, real people playing roles in real life and bogus and legit websites. The objective: a fully rounded gaming experience that bleeds over into everyday life. They could also have real-world applications like group dynamics and problem solving.

Alternate Reality Video Games Blur Many Lines

March 1, 2005

“Alternate-reality gaming” — an obsession-inspiring genre that blends real-life treasure hunting, interactive storytelling, coded web sites, video games and online community — may, incidentally, be one of the most powerful guerrilla marketing mechanisms ever invented.

Alternative Energy Trends and Implications for GCC Countries

September 6, 2008

Masdar City aims to be the first carbon neutral city in the world, using solar power, ecological architecture with passive energy balance and high energy efficiency, extensive recycling of waste, and a modern system of public transportation.

According to Masdar officials, the total projected investment for Masdar City is $22 billion, including $15 billion for Masdar renewable energy projects. People will start to move in by 2010 and the… read more

‘Altruistic’ brain region found

January 23, 2007

Using brain scans, Duke University Medical Center researchers have found that altruism appears to be linked to an area of the brain called the posterior superior temporal sulcus.

Alzheimer’s disease cause identified?

January 9, 2004

Researchers may have pinpointed the cause of Alzheimer’s disease: a rogue protein called amyloid beta that forms plaques in the brain.

Drugs that reduce this protein in humans may have the same protective effect.

In experiements with a strain of Alzheimer’s disease-prone mouse, as the animals age, amyloid beta levels rise and their memory declines. But when a key enzyme, called BACE1, is eliminated through genetic engineering, the… read more

Alzheimer’s drug ‘halts’ decline

July 30, 2008

Aberdeen University researchers have developed a drug that may halt the progression of Alzheimer’s disease by targeting build-up of Tau tangles (clumps of protein inside nerve cells in the brain).

Trials of the drug Rember in 321 patients showed significant decreases in the rate of mental decline in patients taking the drug. Imaging data also suggested the drug may have had its biggest effect in the parts of the… read more

Alzheimer’s sufferers are more likely to have jobs that are less mentally challenging

August 10, 2004

A study published today in the journal of the American Academy of Neurology shows that Alzheimer’s sufferers are more likely to have jobs that are less mentally challenging than people without Alzheimer’s disease.

The researchers also found that those with Alzheimer’s disease had jobs with more physical demands.

Researchers did not control for socioeconomic status or environmental demands and exposures of occupations.

Alzheimer’s Vaccine Clears Plaque But Has Little Effect On Learning And Memory Impairment

April 7, 2008

A promising vaccine being tested for Alzheimer’s disease that clears beta-amyloid plaques from the brain does not seem to help restore lost learning and memory abilities, according to a new study by University of California at Irvine researchers.

The results suggest that treating plaques by themselves may have limited clinical benefit if started after significant plaque growth, so Alzheimer’s disease therapies must also target related neuron damage and cognitive… read more

Alzheimer’s: Beyond Stem Cells

June 25, 2004

Embryonic stem cells aren’t the most promising source to find treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, researchers say. Other possibilities, such as treating buildups of protein in the brain, will likely reap rewards faster.

Alzheimer’s researchers creating ‘designer tracker’ to quantify elusive brain protein, provide earlier diagnosis

April 26, 2013

Dual channel fluoresecence microscopy of Alzheimer’s disease brain reveals presence of extracellular Abeta- (red) and intracellular tau- (green) bearing lesions.  Figure courtesy of Kristen E Funk, PhD.

By using computer-aided drug discovery, an Ohio State University molecular biochemist and molecular imaging chemist are collaborating to create an imaging chemical that attaches predominantly to tau-bearing lesions in living brain.

Their hope is that the “designer” tracer will open the door for earlier diagnosis — and better treatments for Alzheimer’s, frontal temporal dementia and traumatic brain injuries like those suffered by professional athletes, all… read more

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