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Adobe offers early peek at Apollo

March 19, 2007

Apollo, planned for the second half of this year, is designed to bridge the world of Web applications and desktop computers.

The release of the software is highly anticipated among people who develop so-called rich Internet applications, meaning Web applications that have some of the interactivity of traditional desktop applications.

Adroit Droids

October 29, 2004

Advances in sensors, software, and computer architecture are beginning to give robots a sense of their “bodies” and of what sorts of actions are safe and useful in their environments.

One of the world’s most advanced robots passed an important test at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston: it learned to use tools to tighten bolts on a wheel. Rather than having to be separately programmed for each of… read more

Adult brain cells made to multiply and regenerate

August 21, 2006

Adult human brain cells can generate new tissue when implanted into in the brains of mice, new research reveals. The findings could pave the way to new therapies for a host of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s.

Adult Cells, Reprogrammed To Embryonic Stem Cell Like State, Treat Sickle-cell Anemia In Mice

December 10, 2007

Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research scientists have successfully treated mice with a human sickle-cell anemia disease trait in a process that begins by directly reprogramming their own cells to an embryonic-stem-cell-like state, without the use of eggs.

This is the first proof-of-principle of therapeutic application in mice of directly reprogrammed “induced pluripotent stem” (IPS) cells, which recently have been derived in mice as well as humans.

Adult heart derived stem cells develop into heart muscle

April 24, 2008

University Medical Center Utrecht and Hubrecht Institute researchers have succeeded in taking stem cells from adult human hearts and growing them into large numbers of new heart muscle cells.

The stem cells were derived from material left over from open-heart operations, and grew into fully developed heart muscle cells that contract rhythmically, respond to electrical activity, and react to adrenaline.

The method results in identical cells that could… read more

Adult stem cell transplants fail in 2 studies

March 23, 2004

Two failed attempts to transplant adult stem cells into the hearts of laboratory mice are casting doubt on the value and safety of clinical trials testing a similar approach to repair the hearts of humans.

Adult stem cells can at least make blood

January 26, 2007

Transplanted “multipotent” adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) from bone marrow were able to form all blood cell types in mouse experiments.

Adult stem cells help heal broken bones

June 17, 2008

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers have shown that transplanting adult stem cells to broken bones can help to heal fractures in mice.

The researchers took adult stem cells from the bone marrow of mice that had fractured tibia (the long bone of the leg). The cells were engineered to make insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a potent bone regenerator. When the cells were injected into the… read more

Adult stem cells that do not age

October 4, 2010

Biomedical researchers at the University at Buffalo have engineered adult stem cells that scientists can grow continuously in culture, a discovery that could speed development of cost-effective treatments for diseases including heart disease, diabetes, immune disorders and neurodegenerative diseases.

UB scientists created the new “MSC Universal”cell lines by genetically altering mesenchymal stem cells, which are found in bone marrow and can differentiate into cell types including bone, cartilage, muscle,… read more

Advance in dip-pen nanolithography promises miniaturized gene chips, nanoscale electronics

September 27, 2006

Northwestern University researchers have developed a 55,000-pen, two-dimensional array that allows them to simultaneously create 55,000 identical patterns drawn with tiny dots of molecular ink on substrates of gold or glass. Each structure is only a single molecule tall.

The parallel process paves the way for making DPN competitive with other optical and stamping lithographic methods used for patterning large areas on metal and semiconductor substrates, including silicon wafers.… read more

Advanced ‘artificial skin’ senses touch, humidity, and temperature

July 10, 2013

Artificial skin (credit: Technion)

Technion-Israel Institute of Technology scientists have discovered how to make a new kind of flexible sensor that one day could be integrated into “electronic skin” (e-skin) — a covering for prosthetic limbs that would allow patients to feel touch, humidity, and temperature.

Current kinds of e-skin detect only touch, but the Technion team’s invention “can simultaneously sense touch (pressure), humidity, and temperature, as real skin… read more

Advanced exoskeleton promises more independence for people with paraplegia

November 1, 2012

Parker-Hannifin design concept for the commercial version of the exoskeleton (credit: Parker-Hannifin Corporation)

A new powered exoskeleton that enables people with severe spinal cord injuries to stand, walk, sit and climb stairs has been developed by Vanderbilt University’s Center for Intelligent Mechatronics. Its light weight, compact size, and modular design promise to provide users with an unprecedented degree of independence.

Parker Hannifin Corporation has signed an exclusive licensing agreement to develop a commercial version of the device, which it plans to introduce in… read more

Advanced humanoid Roboy to be ‘born’ in nine months

December 26, 2012

roboy

Meet Roboy, “one of the most advanced humanoid robots,” say researchers at the Artificial Intelligence Laboratory of the University of Zurich.

Their 15 project partners and over 40 engineers and scientists are constructing Roboy as a tendon-driven robot modeled on human beings (robots usually have their motors in their joints, giving them that “robot” break-dance look), so it will move almost as elegantly as a… read more

Advanced paper could allow for inexpensive biomedical and diagnostic devices

June 4, 2013

Droplets of water, motor oil, ethylene glycol and n-hexadecane solvent bead up on a superamphiphobic paper sample prepared at the Georgia Institute of Technology. (photo credit: Gary Meek)

By modifying the underlying network of cellulose fibers, etching off surface “fluff” and applying a thin chemical coating, Georgia Institute of Technology researchers have created a new type of paper that repels a wide variety of liquids — including water and oil.

The paper takes advantage of the “lotus effect” — used by leaves of the lotus plant — to repel liquids through the creation… read more

Advanced quantum computer to be developed

April 25, 2001

University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers plan to use silicon germanium quantum dots to create a quantum computer.

Under a U.S. Army Research Office $1.2 million grant, the team will combine advanced physics theory, silicon-germanium heterostructured materials, and low-temperature and high frequency measurements to build a semiconductor-based quantum gate or qubit.

Researchers predict the process could be scaled to make and link thousands of qubits, resulting in the first useful… read more

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