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All Bio Systems Are Go

October 22, 2004

Systems biologists are pushing the envelope of preventive medicine through research centered on the interactions of the thousands of pieces of DNA, RNA and proteins that network together in each cell of our body.

According to its proponents, systems biology will revolutionize medicine, transforming it from something that is mainly reactive into something that is predictive and will eventually prevent diseases getting hold in the first place.

The… read more

All Done With Mirrors: NIST Microscope Tracks Nanoparticles In 3-D

March 11, 2008
 Four side views of a nanoparticle floating in solution (left) are reflected up. A microscope above the well sees the real particle (center, right) and four reflections that show the particle

A new microscope design allows nanotechnology researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to track the motions of nanoparticles in solution as they dart around in three dimensions.

The technology may lead to a better understanding of the dynamics of nanoparticles in fluids and, ultimately, process control techniques for “directed self-assembly.” This capitalizes on physical properties and chemical affinities of nanoparticles in solutions to… read more

All eyes switch to ‘smart’ TVs

January 9, 2008

The shift towards internet-connected or “smart” TVs is an important trend identified by CES show in Las Vegas, driven by consumer desire to view YouTube videos and other digital content On TV sets, directly from the Internet or home networks.

All human life is indexed on the web

October 11, 2005

Search technology is the fastest growing business in the history of media and may lead to the creation of Hal of 2001, says John Battelle in his book Search: How Google and its Rivals Rewrote the Rules of Business and Transformed Our Culture.

All of a sudden I could see a little flash of light. It was amazing.

First implantation of an early prototype bionic eye with 24 electrodes
September 3, 2012

Early bionic eye prototype drawing (credit: Bionics Institute)

Bionic Vision Australia researchers have successfully performed the first implantation of an early prototype bionic eye with 24 electrodes.

Dianne Ashworth has profound vision loss due to retinitis pigmentosa, an inherited condition. She has now received what she calls a “pre-bionic eye” implant that enables her to experience some vision.

Her implant was switched on last month at the Bionics Institute, while researchers held their breaths in… read more

All Science Is Computer Science

March 24, 2001

Research in physics, biology and other fields of science are becoming increasingly dependent on complex simulations using supercomputers.

Celera’s computerized genomic map required analyzing some 80 trillion bytes of data. Other complex computational modeling projects include the rise and fall of native cultures, subnuclear particles and the Big Bang.

All the news that’s fit for searching

March 25, 2004

Microsoft researchers are creating technology to make searching for news more effective. “NewsJunkie” could help Microsoft develop a search function in Windows to compete with Google.

Using AI and information retrieval, NewsJunkie keeps track of what a reader has already seen. It reorganizes news stories to rank those with the most new information at the top and push those with repetitive information to the bottom, or filter them out… read more

All the World’s an MIT Campus

October 4, 2002

MIT has posted a sampling of its free courses, with 32 classes in 17 departments, on its OpenCourseWare (OCW) website.

Over the next decade, the university will post lecture notes, assignments, syllabi, tutorials, video simulations and reading lists from over 2,000 courses on the site.

‘All-optical’ switch could advance light-based telecommunications

April 29, 2005

Duke University physicists have developed a switching technique that uses a very weak laser beam to control a much stronger beam. The achievement could make optical telecommunications devices perform far more efficiently.

The report in Science also suggests possible techniques for using switching beams as weak as single photons, making them useful for quantum computing.

Duke University news release

All-optical switching promises terahertz-speed hard drive and RAM memory

April 4, 2013

Magnetic structure in a colossal magneto-resistive manganite is<br />
switched from antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic ordering during<br />
about 100 femtosecond laser pulse photo-excitation (credit: DOE Ames Laboratory)

Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory, Iowa State University, and the University of Crete in Greece have found a new way to switch magnetism that is at least 1000 times faster than currently used in magnetic memory technologies.

Magnetic switching is used to encode information in hard drives, magnetic random access memory and other computing devices. The discovery, reported in the April 4 issue… read more

Allen claims success in work on computers that can reason

June 16, 2003

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen has claimed preliminary success in Project Halo, a hitherto secret project to enable computers to answer questions they’ve never seen before and to state their reasoning.

The project’s early phases are limited to facts in hard science, so Allen’s Vulcan Inc. investment arm stands a better chance of success than did earlier, sweeping AI projects seeking to reduce all human knowledge to computer-readable form, said… read more

Allen donates $100 million to help decipher the brain

September 16, 2003

Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen has donated $100 million to launch a private research organization in Seattle devoted to deciphering the links between our genes and our brain.

Allen is expected to formally announce the creation of the Allen Institute for Brain Science and its inaugural project, the “Allen Brain Atlas,” on Tuesday. The atlas aims to identify 10,000 genes per year; it will actually model the mouse brain, which… read more

Allen Institute for Brain Science launches Allen Human Brain Atlas

May 25, 2010

The Allen Institute for Brain Science has launched the Allen Human Brain Atlas, a publicly available online atlas charting genes at work throughout the human brain.

The data provided in this initial data release represent the most extensive and detailed body of information about gene activity in the human brain to date, documenting which genes are expressed, or “turned on,” where.

The Allen Human Brain Atlas, available at… read more

Allen’s newest venture for a galaxy far, far away

October 11, 2007

Today, Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen will join scientists from SETI – the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence – to unveil the first major telescope devoted full time to answering the question: Is anyone out there?

The first mission for the Allen Telescope Array will be to scan several billion stars across a vast swath of our own Milky Way galaxy, said astronomer Seth Shostak, of the SETI Institute in Mountain… read more

Alligator blood proteins may fight antibiotic-resistant infections

April 8, 2008

Louisiana State University and McNeese State University researchers have found that proteins in alligator blood may provide a source of new antibiotics to help fight infections.

Alligators have an unusually strong immune system that is very different from that of humans. It fights microorganisms such as fungi, viruses, and bacteria without having prior exposure to them.

Proteins extracted from their white blood cells (leucocytes) killed a wide range… read more

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