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Speed thrills with neural networks

February 17, 2006

Software and hardware-based neural network-based techniques are being successfully applied to engine control and diagnostics in automotive embedded systems.

Taking them further, Steve Furber, ICL Professor of Computer Engineering at Manchester University, is planning to model various ways in which neurons may express information in their patterns of spikes, based on the assumption that populations of neurons producing firing patterns have a very high information capacity, based on the… read more

Speed-of-light computing comes a step closer

July 20, 2007

Harvard University researchers have devised a light-based transistor made of semiconducting nanowires that could be a key building block of machines that are hundreds of times faster than today’s supercomputers.

It uses a single photon to switch the state of a light beam. This is the first workable suggestion for building an optical computer, they say.

Speedier Bug Catching

March 31, 2010

Engineers at Stanford University have proposed a new method called “instruction footprint recording and analysis” (IFRA) to help locate bugs in a fraction of the time normally required.

About 1 percent of the transistors on a chip are used to record a log of chip activity–the instructions that pass through the chip’s circuits. This log can be extracted from the chip, dumped into a computer, and analyzed to find… read more

Speedier cell-phone circuitry

June 10, 2011

Graphene circuit (credit: Science/AAAS)

Researchers at IBM have made the best integrated circuits yet from graphene, a material that promises much faster components than silicon allows, but has proven difficult to work with.

The team made the circuits using existing manufacturing methods, showing that graphene could be used to make faster, more power-efficient radio communications circuitry for cell phones, and other wireless devices.

The researchers made a frequency mixer, combining one graphene… read more

Speeding up biomolecular evolution

April 11, 2011

Scientists at Harvard University have harnessed the ability of fast-replicating bacterial viruses to accelerate the evolution of biomolecules in the laboratory.

The research exploited the continuous culture and selection of bacterial viruses to enable the continuous directed evolution of proteins and nucleic acids. This phage-assisted continuous evolution (PACE) is roughly 100 times faster than conventional laboratory evolution, and far less labor-intensive for scientists.

The… read more

Speeding up brain networks might boost IQ

June 10, 2009

After analyzing the brain as an incredibly dense network of interconnected points, a team of Dutch scientists has found that the most efficiently wired brains tend to belong to the most intelligent people.

And improving this efficiency with drugs suggests a way to boost intelligence, say researchers.

Speeding up genome sequencing

November 25, 2003

The BioMEMS 768 Sequencer can sequence the entire human genome in only one year, processing up to 7 million DNA letters a day, about seven times faster than its nearest rival. It will be tested at Whitehead Institute this fall.

The technology eventually will help scientists quickly determine the exact genetic sequence of the DNA of many different organisms, and could lead to faster forensic analysis of DNA gathered… read more

Speeding up lab testing for medical diagnosis and toxin detection

Faster, less expensive device gives lab test results in 15 minutes at point-of-care
July 13, 2012

SpinDx-device

Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories have developed a lab-on-a-disk platform that they believe will be faster, less expensive and more versatile than similar medical diagnostic tools.

Lab officials are seeking industry partners to license and commercialize the SpinDx technology, which can determine a patient’s white blood cell count, analyze important protein markers, and process up to 64 assays from a single sample, all… read more

Speedy robot legs it to break record

April 5, 2006

Runbot, a two-legged robot that walks at record-breaking speed, has been developed by researchers from Germany and Scotland.

At 30 centimeters high, it can walk at a speedy 3.5 leg-lengths per second. The robot is controlled by a simple program that mimics the way neurons control reflexes in humans and other animals: it detects just two things — when a foot touches the ground and when a leg swings… read more

Speedy silicon sets world record

August 18, 2006

A simple tweak to the way common silicon transistors are made — adding fluorine implants to the silicon layers using a common ion-implantation manufacturing process — could allow them to operate at a speed of about 110GHz, using existing silicon manufacturing technology.

Sperm and eggs created in dish produce mouse pups

October 5, 2012

mouse_pups

After producing normal mouse pups last year using sperm derived from stem cells, a Kyoto University team of researchers has now accomplished the same feat using eggs created the same way, Science Now reports. The study may eventually lead to new ways of helping infertile couples conceive.

The stem cells in both cases are embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The former are taken… read more

Sperm-inspired microrobots controlled by magnetic fields

May be useful for drug delivery, IVF, cell sorting, and nano/micro assembly
June 5, 2014

microrobot

A team of researchers at the University of Twente (Netherlands) and German University in Cairo has developed sperm-inspired microrobots that can be controlled by weak oscillating magnetic fields.

Described in a cover article in AIP Publishing’s journal Applied Physics Letters, the 322 micron-long robots consist of a head coated in a thick cobalt-nickel layer and an uncoated tail.

When the microrobot is subjected to an oscillating field of… read more

Sperm-like cells made from human embryonic stem cells

July 8, 2009

Human embryonic stem cells have been coaxed into forming sperm-like cells, Karim Nayernia of the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne and colleagues report.

They have also launched a project to produce sperm cells from induced pluripotent stem cells, which can be generated from adult cells. Such cells would make it easier to derive sperm cells from many individuals.

Sperm-like nanopropeller is smallest swimmer ever

May 27, 2009
(American Chemical Society)

Harvard University researchers have developed remote-controlled nano-devices that mimic the corkscrew motion of flagella and that may one day deliver drugs to where they are needed in the body.

The devices have a spherical head 200 to 300 nanometers across and a corkscrew-shaped tail 1 to 2 microns long. They are coated with cobalt, allowing an external magnetic field to make the propellers corkscrew through water at… read more

‘Spider pill’ used for scans

October 13, 2009

Italian doctors have developed a wirelessly controlled device with camera and moving legs for gastrointestinal examinations, replacing invasive endoscopes. (Video)

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