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Nanotubes route signals at up to 10 GHz

June 10, 2005

UC Irvine scientists have demonstrated for the first time that carbon nanotubes can route electrical signals on a chip faster than traditional copper or aluminum wires, at speeds of up to 10 GHz.

The research integrates high-speed nanotube-interconnect technology and high-speed nanotube-transistor technology into an ultra-high-speed all-nanotube electronic circuit that could be faster than any existing semiconductor technology.

UC Irvine news release

A case of mistaken identity crisis

June 10, 2005

People afflicted with multiple personalities reveal that the idea of the self is a fiction.

The illusion of self is merely a by-product of the brain’s organizational sophistication.

Benjamin Libet conducted an experiment in which he found that the brain activity began about half a second before the person was aware of deciding to act. The conscious decision came far too late to be the cause of the… read more

Honey, I Shrunk the PC

June 10, 2005

University of Arizona scientists have discovered how to use quantum mechanics to turn molecules into working transistors in the lab at room temperature, a breakthrough that might one day lead to high-powered computers the size of a postage stamp.

The proposed transistor is a ring-shaped molecule such as benzene. Attaching the two electrical leads to non-opposite sides of the ring allows the electrons to flow through the molecular ring… read more

HP Unveils New Interface For Nano-Electronic Circuits

June 10, 2005

According to HP, coding theory will be the key to building a “defect tolerant interface” for its nanoelectronic cross-bar architecture in future processors.

The method adds 50 percent more nanowires as an “insurance policy” to fabricate nano-electronic circuits with nearly perfect yields even though the probability of broken components will be high.

Nanowires show promise for atomic engines

June 9, 2005

Atomic electromagnets made from coils of individual gold atoms could prove valuable for nanocircuits and machines.

Toshiba Readies Write-Once HD-DVDs

June 9, 2005

Volume production of a write-once HD-DVD-R disc that can store 15GB of data will begin in the first half of next year, about the same time that HD-DVD recorders and PC drives will become available.

The write-once discs are expected to offer a cheaper alternative to HD-DVD-RW rewritable discs for customers who buy HD-DVD equipment.

The replicator: create your own body double

June 9, 2005

Two computer scientists are trying to build an intelligent material that can replicate a physical 3-D facsimile of you from nothing more than a stream of video images.

If it works, all you’ll need to project yourself around the globe is an Internet connection and a pile of their “claytronics” self-organizing nanocomputers that can stick to each other and communicate with built-in wireless at the other end to assemble… read more

New suspect implicated in the development of cancer

June 9, 2005

“MicroRNA” molecules – which differ from ordinary messenger RNA in not carrying information for making proteins – are emerging as key gene switches regulating embryo development and cell replication. Now, new evidence shows mis-regulation of microRNAs might trigger development of cancers.

The machine that can copy anything

June 6, 2005

The RepRap, a revolutionary machine that can copy itself and manufacture everyday objects quickly and cheaply, could transform industry in the developing world.

The machine could build items ranging in size from a few millimeters to around 30 centimeters, such as plates, dishes, combs and musical instruments.

The design of the RepRap will be available online and free to use.

See virtual worlds in the round

June 6, 2005

A goldfish bowl in which real-time 3D video images appear suspended in mid-air has been developed by Actuality Systems.

It will be used to visualize slices of the Earth’s crust from seismic data, human organs from MRI and CT scans, and squadrons of aircraft from radar data.

Mission to build a simulated brain begins

June 6, 2005

The “Blue Brain” project, an effort to create the first computer simulation of the entire human brain, right down to the molecular level, has been launched by IBM and the Brain and Mind Institute at the Ecole Polytecnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Switzerland.

Calling on a database of the neural architecture of the neocortex, they will map and model the behavior of neocortical columns.

In the second phase,… read more

Scientists Develop Next-Generation Memory Chip

June 3, 2005

A team of international scientists has developed next-generation memory technology that is theoretically capable of makng a 10-nanometer-thick semiconductor.

Can Tamiflu save us from bird flu?

June 3, 2005

Amid ominous signs that H5N1 bird flu is acquiring the ability to spread more readily among people, many health authorities are pinning their hopes on Tamiflu, but supplies are limited.

TV’s Future Is Here, but It Needs Work

June 2, 2005

What if you had a TiVo-like set-top box, complete with a hard drive that could hold 200 hours of video – but instead of recording live broadcasts, you could tap into an enormous library of shows, stored on the Internet, and watch them whenever you liked?

Camera sees behind objects

June 2, 2005

Researchers from Stanford University and Cornell University have put together a projector-camera system that can read a playing card that is facing away from the camera.

The dual-photography system gains information from a subject by analyzing the way projected patterns of light bounce off it.

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