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Chip protects single atoms

July 2, 2004

Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Physics and Ludwig Maximilians University have found a way to closely control the quantum states of single atoms trapped in a microchip.

The method is a step toward building devices that depend on traits of single atoms, like miniature atomic clocks that are an order of magnitude more accurate than those that exist today, and quantum computers.

The researchers’ chip… read more

Holograms enable pocket projectors

July 2, 2004

Researchers from the University of Cambridge and Light Blue Optics Ltd. have used holographic technology to produce a small laser-driven video projector.

The method could lead to pocket-sized, battery-powered video projectors that produce images whose quality matches that of today’s full-sized projectors,

The (Nano) Arms Race Has Begun

July 2, 2004

India’s new President A. P. J. Abdul Kalam called today for India to develop nanotechnology — including nanobots — because it will revolutionize warfare.

He called for scientists to develop “super strong, smart and intelligent structures in the field of material science and this in turn could lead new production of nano robots with new types of explosives and sensors for air, land and space systems.”

“This is… read more

Nanotech Arms Races

July 1, 2004

An advanced, general-purpose molecular manufacturing technology could have a significant destabilizing effect and lead to an international arms race; even a nuclear power might not be able to deter a nano power, concludes a preliminary study by the Center for Responsible Nanotechnology.

Net Attack Aimed at Banking Data

July 1, 2004

Computer security experts warned yesterday of another new Internet threat that can steal the passwords and account information of people who bank online — the second such discovery in a week.

Robots get sensitive

July 1, 2004

An electronic skin as sensitive to touch as our own is being developed for robots by scientists in Japan.

It consists of a sheet of rubbery polymer, impregnated with flakes of electrically conducting graphite. The electrical resistance of the sheet changes when it is squeezed, and this change is detected by an array of transistors beneath the rubber.

The skin could also find applications in sport, security and… read more

Hybrid nano-wires provide link to silicon

July 1, 2004

Nanowires that could be plugged into conventional computer circuits have been developed by Charles Lieber and colleagues at Harvard University.

The nanowires were made highly conductive by blending silicon and nickel together.

The researchers have also shown that the method can be used to create simple nanoscale electronic components, e.g., field-effect transistors. “By extending our approach to crossed nanowires it should become possible to assemble large and dense… read more

Speed of light may have changed recently

July 1, 2004

The speed of light may have been lower as recently as two billion years ago on Earth, based on measurements of the fine structure constant, or alpha, which dictates the strength of the electromagnetic force.

I, Robocop

June 30, 2004

In the forthcoming film “I, Robot,” Actor Will Smith plays a police detective investigating a murder allegedly committed by a robot.

Q: I understand Proyas asked the entire cast to read Ray Kurzweil’s The Age of Spiritual Machines. What did you think of the book?

A: Actually, the Wachowski brothers turned me onto it first. Kurzweil has an interesting, kind of twisted look at the potentiality of the… read more

Fractals show machine intentions

June 29, 2004

Some day machines could build themselves, which means they might not necessarily be designed to communicate with people. This could make interacting with machines difficult.

One solution is to give people a means of interpreting machines that’s similar to the way we read each other’s body language. A team of researchers has proposed a way to do so that combines fractals with algorithms that automatically cluster data.

Fragments boost 3D TV

June 29, 2004

The ultimate in video is a system that renders three-dimensional images in real-time and lets the viewer change viewpoints at will.

It takes a lot of network bandwidth to transmit that much information, however. A system that turns two-dimensional pixels from a camera array into a set of independent points in space promises to lighten the load.

Computing Gets Physical

June 29, 2004

Gadgets that let you control computers with a wave or a nod could offer an escape from keyboards and mice.

Gesture recognition technology aims to become this millennium’s remote control — a fluid, freeing means of interacting with all the digital stuff around us. Think Minority Report.

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News Analysis: The Tera of the Internet

June 29, 2004

The next generation of routers, with speeds approaching 100 terabits/second, will be the foundation for every last digital service we can imagine (and some that we can’t).

Tech Science Out on a Limb

June 29, 2004

From tiny memory chips to fanless cooling systems, cutting-edge researchers are investigating new ways to make computing devices smaller, faster and cheaper.

From organic computer memory cells to super-nanocapacitors, many of the most promising lines of research involve molecular scale technology.

What We Don’t Know Can Hurt Us

June 28, 2004

Privacy advocates are hindering development of sophisticated pattern-analysis and data mining tools for detecting terrorist networks, say some experts.

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