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Germany to tap brakes on high-speed trading

October 29, 2012

hft_chart

Germany is set to advance a bill Wednesday imposing a spate of new rules on high-frequency trading, escalating Europe’s sweeping response to concerns that speedy traders have brought instability to the markets.

The measure seeks to require traders to register with Germany’s Federal Financial Supervisory Authority, collect fees from those who use high-speed trading systems excessively, and force stock markets to install circuit breakers that can interrupt trading if… read more

Carbon nanotubes to replace silicon: IBM

October 29, 2012

IBM carbon nanotube: The substrate gets dipped in the carbon nanotube solution and the nanotubes attach via a chemical bond to the coating in the HfO2 trenches (credit: IBM)

IBM scientists have precisely placed and tested more than 10,000 carbon nanotube devices in a single chip, using standard semiconductor manufacturing processes — paving the way for carbon technology to replace silicon in future computing and allowing further miniaturization of computing components. The development promises to lead the way for future microelectronics, with controlled placement of individual nanotubes at a density of about a billion per square centimeter.… read more

How to identify and predict human activities from video

October 30, 2012

minds_eye_cmu

A video shows a woman carrying a box into a building.  Later, it shows her leaving the building without it. What was she doing?

Carnegie Mellon University’s (CMU) Mind’s Eye program is creating intelligent software that will recognize human activities in video and predict what might happen next. It will also flag unusual events and deduce actions that may be occurring off-camera.

Automating the time-consuming job of… read more

Detecting early-stage diseases with the naked eye

October 30, 2012

Simple test developed by Professor Stevens and her colleague (credit: Roberto de la Rica and Molly M. Stevens/Imperial College of London)

Imperial College London scientists have developed a prototype ultra-sensitive sensor that would enable doctors to detect the early stages of diseases and viruses with the naked eye.

The visual sensor technology is ten times more sensitive than the current gold-standard methods for measuring biomarkers. These indicate the onset of diseases such as prostate cancer and infection by viruses including HIV.

The researchers say their sensor… read more

Transcranial magnetic brain stimulation treats depression without affecting sleep

October 30, 2012

497px-NeuroStar_TMS_Therapy_System

While powerful transcanial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the frontal lobe of the brain can alleviate symptoms of depression, those receiving the treatment did not report effects on sleep or arousal commonly seen with antidepressant medications, researchers have found.

“People’s sleep gets better as their depression improves, but the treatment doesn’t itself cause sedation or insomnia.” said Dr. Peter B. Rosenquist, Vice Chair of the Department of… read more

Titan supercomputer capable of 20 petaflops peak performance

October 30, 2012

Titan_ornl

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has launched a new era of scientific supercomputing today with Titan, a system capable of more than 20,000 trillion calculations each second — or 20 petaflops — peak performance by employing a family of processors called graphic processing units (GPUs) first created for computer gaming.

Titan is now one of the world’s fastest supercomputers,… read more

Strengthening fragile forests of carbon nanotubes

October 31, 2012

A carbon-nanotube forest (credit: BYU)

 

Brigham Young University (BYU) researchers have created stronger microstructures that can form precise, tall and narrow 3-D shapes for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

MEMS are ultra-tiny devices, often built on the scale of microns (millionths of a meter). Conventional MEMS structures tend to be made out of silicon-based materials familiar to the micro-electronics industry, but this ignores a suite of useful materials such… read more

Omega-3 improves working memory in healthy young adults

October 31, 2012

Lovaza

Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh have determined that healthy young adults ages 18–25 can improve their working memory by increasing their Omega-3 fatty acid intake.

Before they began taking the supplements, all participants were asked to perform a working memory test in which they were shown a series of letters and numbers. The young adults had to keep track of what appeared one, two,… read more

Record 100,000 entangled photons detected

October 31, 2012

quantum_correlations_singlet_bell_state

A whopping 100,000 entangled photons have been detected for the first time, beating the previous record of just 12, New Scientist reports.

The technique could be useful for safely sharing keys used in encrypted communications.

Entangled photons have linked quantum states, such that measuring the state of one photon determines the state of the others, no matter how far apart they are.

Detecting entanglement usually… read more

How to paste augmented-reality video graffiti on streets

October 31, 2012

ar_graffiti

Look closely and you can find digital graffiti — videos, animations, and comments superimposed on buildings and streets around the world.

They are created using apps for smartphones or tablets to edit augmented reality (AR) YouTube videosNew Scientist reports.

Most major cities are teeming with these digital annotations. You just need to identify a tagged location using your smartphone’s map, and watch through the… read more

An autonomous flying robot that avoids obstacles

As smart as a bird in maneuvering around obstacles
October 31, 2012

Miniature autonomous flying robot avoids a tree on the Cornell Arts Quad (credit: Saxena lab)

Able to guide itself through forests, tunnels, or damaged buildings, an autonomous flying robot developed by Ashutosh Saxena, assistant professor of computer science at Cornell University, and his team could have tremendous value in search-and-rescue operations, according to the researchers.

The test vehicle is a quadrotor, a commercially available flying machine table with four helicopter rotors. Human controllers can’t always react swiftly enough, and radio signals may… read more

Advanced exoskeleton promises more independence for people with paraplegia

November 1, 2012

Parker-Hannifin design concept for the commercial version of the exoskeleton (credit: Parker-Hannifin Corporation)

A new powered exoskeleton that enables people with severe spinal cord injuries to stand, walk, sit and climb stairs has been developed by Vanderbilt University’s Center for Intelligent Mechatronics. Its light weight, compact size, and modular design promise to provide users with an unprecedented degree of independence.

Parker Hannifin Corporation has signed an exclusive licensing agreement to develop a commercial version of the device, which it plans to introduce in… read more

Colloidal microparticles that self-assemble into novel 3D structures

Could lead to photonic crystals that improve displays and computer chips
November 1, 2012

Scientists have created new kinds of particles, 1/100th the diameter of a human hair, that spontaneously assemble themselves into structures resembling molecules made from atoms.</p>
<p>Credit: Illustration courtesy of Yufeng Wang and Yu Wang.

Researchers from NYU, Harvard, and Dow Chemical have created new colloidal microparticles that spontaneously self-assemble into structures resembling molecules made from atoms.

These structures were previously impossible to make and hold promise for manufacturing advanced optical materials and ceramics, such as photonic crystals that could improve displays and computer chips.

The method was developed by a team of chemists, chemical engineers, and physicists at New York University (NYU), the Harvard School of… read more

The first all-carbon solar cell

Imagine low-cost solar cells painted on buildings, windows, and cars to provide electricity
November 1, 2012

All-carbon solar cell consists of a photoactive layer, which absorbs sunlight, sandwiched between two electrodes (credit: Bao group, Stanford University)

Stanford University scientists have built the first solar cell made entirely of carbon, a promising alternative to the expensive materials used in photovoltaic devices today.

“Carbon has the potential to deliver high performance at a low cost,” said study senior author Zhenan Bao, a professor of chemical engineering at Stanford.

“To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of… read more

’1000 genomes barrier’ broken

Will help researchers interpret genetic changes in people with disease
November 1, 2012

population_variants

A landmark project that has sequenced 1,092 human genomes from individuals around the world will help researchers to interpret the genetic changes in people with disease.

This first study to break the “1000 genomes barrier” will enable scientists to begin to examine genetic variations at the scale of the populations of individual countries, as well as guiding them in their search for the rare genetic variations related… read more

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