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Super-elastic conducting fibers for artificial muscles, sensors, capacitors

Could lead to super-elastic electronic circuits, robots and exoskeletons with great reach, morphing aircraft, giant-range strain sensors, and failure-free pacemaker leads
July 24, 2015

UT Dallas scientists have constructed novel fibers by wrapping sheets of tiny carbon nanotubes to form a sheath around a long rubber core. This illustration shows complex two-dimensional buckling, shown in yellow, of the carbon nanotube sheath/rubber-core fiber. The buckling results in a conductive fiber with super elasticity and novel electronic properties. (credit: UT Dallas Alan G. MacDiarmid Nanotech Institute)

An international research team based at The University of Texas at Dallas has made electrically conducting fibers that can be reversibly stretched to more than 14 times their initial length and whose electrical conductivity increases 200-fold when stretched.

The research team is using the new fibers to make artificial muscles, as well as capacitors with energy storage capacity that increases about tenfold when the fibers… read more

Super-Eruptions Pose Global Threat ’5-10 Times More Likely Than Asteroid Impact’

April 27, 2005

A volcanic super-eruption would have severe environmental effects and might threaten global civilization. This is the assessment of a Geological Society of London working group composed of senior Earth Scientists.

Super-fast broadband coming via cable?

July 21, 2005

By using Ethernet within cable TV networks, in 2006 the speed of broadband internet over cable TV could reach 100 megabits per second, claims a Finnish technology company.

The new technique for increasing transmission speeds over cable is undergoing field trials in the Netherlands.

Super-fast Google Fiber for Kansas City

July 27, 2012

google_fiber

Google has announced Google Fiber, to be installed first in Kansas City.

Google Fiber is 100 times faster than today’s average broadband.

Imagine: instantaneous sharing; truly global education; medical appointments with 3D imaging; even new industries that we haven’t even dreamed of, powered by a gig.

Google has divided Kansas City into small communities called “fiberhoods.” To get service, each fiberhood needs a critical… read more

Super-high pressures used to create super battery

July 6, 2010

Using super-high pressures similar to those found deep in the Earth or on a giant planet, Washington State University researchers have created a compact, never-before-seen material capable of storing vast amounts of energy.

“It is the most condensed form of energy storage outside of nuclear energy,” says Choong-Shik Yoo, a WSU chemistry professor and lead author of results published in the journal Nature Chemistry. “It shows it is possible… read more

Super-nanotubes: ‘remarkable’ spray-on coating combines carbon nanotubes with ceramic

April 19, 2013

Micrograph of one strand of a new spray-on super-nanotube composite developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Kansas State University. The multi-wall nanotube core is surrounded by a ceramic shell. The composite is a promising coating for laser power detectors. (Color added for clarity.)<br />
Credit: Kansas State University

A spray-on mixture of carbon nanotubes and ceramic that has unprecedented ability to resist damage while absorbing laser light has been demonstrated by researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and Kansas State University.

Coatings that absorb as much of the energy of high-powered lasers as possible without breaking down are essential for optical power detectors that measure the output… read more

‘Super-photon’ could allow for breakthrough in computer-chip performance

November 29, 2010

Artist's illustration of the "super-photon" (Jan Klaers, University of Bonn)

Physicists from the University of Bonn have developed a completely new source of light: a Bose-Einstein condensate consisting of photons.

This method could be suitable for designing novel light sources resembling lasers that work in the x-ray range. Among other applications, they might allow building more powerful computer chips. The scientists report on their discovery in the journal Nature.

By cooling Rubidium atoms deeply and concentrating a sufficient number… read more

Super-resolution atom-by-atom laser machining method allows for making nanoscale devices

March 11, 2014

Diamond-Diagram-2-No-Back-Wireframe

Australian researchers have discovered how to use laser light to pick apart a substance atom by atom, allowing for creating new nanoscale diamond devices.

“Lasers are known to be very precise at cutting and drilling materials on a small scale — less than the width of a human hair, in fact — but on the atomic scale they have notoriously poor resolution,” says lead researcher Associate Professorread more

Super-resolution electron microscopy of soft materials like biomaterials

Breakthrough technique allows for noninvasive nanoscale imaging with electron beams, bypassing optical microscopy limitations
June 5, 2015

CLAIRE image-ft

Soft matter encompasses a broad swath of materials, including liquids, polymers, gels, foam and — most importantly — biomolecules. At the heart of soft materials, governing their overall properties and capabilities, are the interactions of nano-sized components.

Observing the dynamics behind these interactions is critical to understanding key biological processes, such as protein crystallization and metabolism, and could help accelerate the development of important new technologies, such as artificial… read more

Super-resolution microscopy takes on a third dimension

February 3, 2009

Howard Hughes Medical Institute scientists have developed a new interferometry-based imaging technology that produces the best three-dimensional resolution ever seen with an optical microscope, pinpointing fluorescent labels in their images to within 10-20 nanometers.

Super-Resolution X-ray Microscopy unveils the buried secrets of the nanoworld

July 21, 2008

A novel super-resolution X-ray microscope developed by Paul Scherrer Institut and EPFL researchers combines the high penetration power of x-rays with high spatial resolution with raster scanning, making it possible to non-destructively view the detailed interior composition of sub-hundred-nanometer semiconductor devices or biological samples without requiring a vacuum.

Super-sensors To Discover What Happened In First Trillionth Of A Second After Big Bang

May 5, 2009

Super-sensitive microwave detectors built at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will look for faint polarization signals from primordial gravitational waves in the cosmic microwave background next year.

If found, these waves would be the clearest evidence yet in support of the inflation theory, which suggests that all of the currently observable universe expanded rapidly from a subatomic volume, leaving in its wake the telltale cosmic background… read more

Super-stretchy skin-like sensor uses nanotube springs

October 25, 2011

Super-Stretchy Skin-Like Sensor

Stanford University’s Zhenan Bao, associate professor of chemical engineering, has developed a transparent film of single-walled carbon nanotubes that act as tiny springs that accurately measure the force applied.

The sensors could be used in making touch-sensitive prosthetic limbs or robots, in touch screens on computers, or for various medical applications such as pressure-sensitive bandages.

“This sensor can register pressure ranging from a firm pinch between your thumb… read more

‘Super-TB’ Created by Scientists

January 13, 2004

A virulent form of tuberculosis was created in a laboratory by experts trying to alter its genetic structure. They disabled the collection of genes thought to give TB some of its virulence and expected to find a weakened form of TB as a result. Instead, the organism grew in virulence.

‘Super-Turing’ machine learns and evolves

April 9, 2012

(Credit: iStockphoto)

Computer scientist Hava Siegelmann of the Biologically Inspired Neural & Dynamical Systems (BINDS) Laboratory at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, an expert in neural networks, has taken Alan Turing’s work to its next logical step.

She is translating her 1993 discovery of what she has dubbed “Super-Turing” computation into an adaptable computational system that learns and evolves, using input from the environment in a way much more like our… read more

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