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Stressed Mice Quicker To Get Skin Cancer

December 15, 2004

Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientists have found that stress can speed up the onset of skin cancer in mice.

Their study shows that mice exposed to stressful conditions and cancer-causing UV light developed skin cancers in less than half the time it took for non-stressed mice to grow tumors.

The investigators say that if what they are seeing in mice has relevance in man, stress-reducing programs like… read more

A Patch for Broken Hearts

December 14, 2004

MIT researchers have grown a tissue patch that could repair damaged hearts, using electric signals that mimic a heartbeat to force single cardiac cells to develop into tissue similar to that of the native heart.

They attached rat cardiac cells to a three-dimensional collagen scaffold and then zapped the cells with electrical pulses modeled on a rat heartbeat for several days, inducing the cells to grow into beating patches… read more

Living cells get nanosurgery

December 14, 2004

Researchers have turned an atomic force microscope (AFM) into a surgical tool for cells that could add or remove molecules from precise locations inside a cell without harming it.

They used a beam of energetic ions to sharpen a standard silicon AFM tip into a needle just eight micrometers long and 200 nanometers wide.

The needle could allow for injecting molecules into specific regions of a cell or… read more

Wow! That’s fast TCP!

December 14, 2004

Data has been sent across a wide-area optical network at 101Gbit/sec., the fastest-ever sustained data transmission speed, equivalent to downloading three full DVD movies per second, or transmitting all of the content of the Library of
Congress in 15 minutes.

It was demonstrated by a High Energy Physics research team that included the California Institute of Technology, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) and the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratories (FNAL).… read more

A Species in a Second: Promise of DNA ‘Bar Codes’

December 14, 2004

If it works as promised, DNA bar coding will assist in the urgent task of cataloging unknown species before their ranks are decimated by extinction.

The technique depends on analyzing part of just one gene, the same gene in all cases, for every species.

If and when a DNA bar code database of all terrestrial plant and animal species is established, a field biologist could take a tiny… read more

Google Is Adding Major Libraries to Its Database

December 14, 2004

Google plans to announce an agreement today with some of the nation’s leading research libraries and Oxford University to begin converting their holdings into digital files that would be freely searchable over the Web.

Google plans to digitize nearly all the eight million books in Stanford University’s collection and the seven million at the University of Michigan.

The goal is to create a digital card catalog and searchable… read more

Selective coatings create biological sensors from carbon nanotubes

December 13, 2004

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign researchers have developed protein-encapsulated single-walled carbon nanotubes that alter their fluorescence in the presence of specific biomolecules.

The technique could generate many new types of implantable biological sensors. The researchers have already built a near-infrared nanoscale sensor that detects glucose.

Brain Imaging Reveals New Language Circuits

December 13, 2004

Researchers using diffusion tensor (DT) MRI have found a third area of the human brain, dubbed “Geschwind’s territory,” that is part of human language circuits along with Broca’s and Wernicke’s areas.

“There are clues that the parallel pathway network we found is important for the acquisition of language in childhood,” said Marco Catani, M.D., from the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London. “Geschwind’s territory is the last area… read more

Nanotube suppliers accused of selling shoddy goods

December 13, 2004

Researchers who buy products such as carbon nanotubes are frequently being sold defective materials, according to a survey of nanotechnology companies.

The survey suggests that the surge in nanotechnology projects has outpaced the ability of companies to reliably supply the basic materials needed by researchers.

Gene therapy reduces skin cancer from sunburn

December 13, 2004

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas have successfully tested the first gene therapy for skin cancer, using a mouse model for the disease xeroderma pigmentosum, or XP.

Humans with XP have a mutation that prevents the body from repairing DNA damaged by UV light. Mice with mutations in the gene Xpa suffer from XP and develop cancerous lesions on their skin within three weeks after UV light… read more

Neurobiologists distinguish in unprecedented detail the patterns of brain activity

December 13, 2004

Duke University Medical Center neurobiologists have demonstrated that they could distinguish in unprecedented detail the patterns of brain activity — including fleeting changes in communication among brain structures — in awake animals, as they fall sleep and as they transition among different sleep stages.

They believe that their new analytical technique will enable unprecedented insights into function of both the healthy brain and those afflicted with neurological disease.… read more

No effect of nanotubes on white blood cells, researchers find

December 10, 2004

The introduction of nanotubes in white blood cells caused no measurable change in cell properties like shape, rate of growth or the ability to adhere to surfaces, researchers from Rice University, the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, and the Texas Heart Institute have found.

The white blood cells, which were incubated in dilute solutions of Acccnanotubes, treated the nanotubes as they would other extracellular particles –… read more

Complete chicken genome map revealed

December 10, 2004

The complete genome sequence of the chicken has been published.

The chicken is the closest relative of mammals sequenced so far, and should provide a crucial point of comparison in studies of mammalian evolution.

The number of chicken genes is similar to that of mammals, but the chicken genome appears to contain a smaller amount of repetitive “junk” DNA. Comparison of the chicken and human genomes reveals about… read more

Wireless network smashes world speed record

December 10, 2004

A team at the Siemens Communications research laboratory in Munich have transmitted one gigabit of data per second across their mobile network.

The researchers used multiple receiving antennas and Orthogonal Frequency-Division Multiplexing (OFDM) to set their record.

Christoph Caselitz, president of the Mobile Networks Division at Siemens Communications. Caselitz estimates that wireless networks will be expected to cope with 10 times as much data by 2015.

OFDM… read more

Sunlight to Fuel Hydrogen Future

December 9, 2004

The photovoltaic cell is old news: the latest way to exploit the sun is through tiny materials that can directly convert sunlight into large amounts of hydrogen.

Hydrogen Solar of Guilford, England, and Altair Nanotechnologies are building a hydrogen-generation system that captures sunlight and uses the energy to break water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen. The company’s current project is a fuel station in Las Vegas that will soon… read more

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