Most Recently Added Most commentedBy Title | A-Z

The ‘living’ micro-robot that could detect diseases in humans

March 30, 2012

CyberplasmVehicle

A tiny prototype robot that functions like a living creature is being developed that one day could be safely used to pinpoint diseases within the human body.

Called “Cyberplasm,” it will combine advanced microelectronics with latest research in biomimicry (technology inspired by nature). The aim is for Cyberplasm to have an electronic nervous system and “eye” and “nose” sensors derived from mammalian cells, as well as artificial… read more

The loneliness scare — isolation isn’t a growing problem

May 11, 2012

Loneliness

Many commentators believe new technologies have made us lonelier, with headlines likes “Sad, Lonely World Discovered in Cyberspace”; “Alone in the Vast Wasteland”; and “The Lonely American Just Got a Bit Lonelier”; and books such as Bowling AloneThe Lonely American, and Alone Together..

On the contrary, people use new media to enhance their existing relationships, suggests Claude S. Fischer,… read more

The Long Zoom

October 10, 2006

Electronic Arts’ forthcoming Spore game will allow you to “create an world that is entirely yours: the creatures, the vehicles, the cities, the planets,” says designer Will Wright.

Those layers map onto different spatial scales that you advance through as you play: cell, creature, tribe, city, civilization and space.

As you work your way through the Spore levels, your creatures are automatically sent back to the central Spore… read more

The Longevity Dividend

March 10, 2006

Congress should invest $3 billion annually in understanding the biology of aging and how it predisposes us to a suite of costly diseases and disorders expressed at later ages, say a group of researchers led by S. Jay Olshansky, professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the University of Illinois.

The Longevity Pill?

November 29, 2007

Drugs 1,000 times more potent than resveratrol, found in red wine, will be tested by Sirtris to treat diabetes.

The new drugs target an enzyme called SIRT1, which belongs to a class of proteins known as sirtuins that have been shown to lengthen life span in lower organisms, bringing the benefits of caloric restriction without the strict diet.

“As far as I’m aware, this is the first anti-aging… read more

The love hormone is two-faced

Surprise finding shows oxytocin strengthens bad memories and can increase fear and anxiety
July 24, 2013

oxtr_fear

Oxytocin has long been known as the warm, fuzzy hormone that promotes feelings of love, social bonding and well-being. It’s even being tested as an anti-anxiety drug.

But new Northwestern Medicine research shows oxytocin also can cause emotional pain, an entirely new, darker identity for the hormone.

Oxytocin appears to be the reason stressful social situations, perhaps being bullied at school or tormented by a boss,… read more

The Love Machine: Building computers that care

November 26, 2003

Researchers at MIT’s Media Lab are trying to build computers that care about their users.

Affective computing proponents believe computers should be designed to recognize, express, and influence emotion in users.

The lowest-price, easiest-to-use 3D printer yet

April 16, 2014

The Micro 3D printer (credit: MD3)

If you’re on the edge about deciding to get a 3D printer, this Kickstarter campaign for The Micro, billed as the “first truly consumer 3D printer,” may just push you off it.

It already has for more than 9,000 backers, who have pledged an impressive $2.7 million since April 7 — far exceeding the $50,000 goal.

For a pledge of $299, you get the pre-assembled printer… read more

The Lure of Data: Is It Addictive?

July 7, 2003

Multitasking may be counterproductive and addicting, say Harvard researchers, naming it “pseudo-attention deficit disorder.”

Multitaskers have shorter attention spans, become frustrated with long-term projects, thrive on the stress of constant fixes of information, and physically crave the bursts of stimulation from checking e-mail or voice mail or answering the phone. The process takes the same pathway as drugs of abuse and pleasure, generating dopamine, the researchers believe.

The machine that can copy anything

June 6, 2005

The RepRap, a revolutionary machine that can copy itself and manufacture everyday objects quickly and cheaply, could transform industry in the developing world.

The machine could build items ranging in size from a few millimeters to around 30 centimeters, such as plates, dishes, combs and musical instruments.

The design of the RepRap will be available online and free to use.

The machines are talking a lot

February 15, 2012

cismomobiledata

Cisco has released its annual analysis of how much Internet usage is growing on mobile devices, and the report produced some staggering numbers, says Technology Review Editors blog.

Cisco expects 7.6 exabytes of data flowing to mobile devices per month in 2016, about 70 percent of the total of 10.8 exabytes of data per month. (An exabyte is 1 billion gigabytes.)

The second-leading source… read more

THE MAGLEV: The Super-powered Magnetic Wind Turbine

December 10, 2007

The new MagLev wind turbine is expected take wind power technology to the next level by using magnetic levitation.

One large MagLev wind turbine could generate one gigawatt of clean power (vs. five megawatts for the largest conventional wind turbines), enough to supply energy to 750,000 homes. It would also increase generation capacity by 20% over conventional wind turbines, decrease operational costs by 50%, and be operational for about… read more

The making of Arduino

October 27, 2011

Arduino board

Arduino recently unveiled the Arduino Due, a board with a 32-bit Cortex-M3 ARM processor that offers more computing power for makers with complex projects such as FM radios, 3-D printer kits, or drones.

Google has also released an Arduino-based developer board that lets an Android phone interact with motors, sensors, and other devices. This permits building Android apps that use the phone’s camera,… read more

The making of Final Fantasy

July 11, 2001

Final Fantasy’s hyperreal animation was achieved by Honolulu-based Square USA, using Maya for animation authoring and RenderMan for rendering.

Square animators used four Silicon Graphics M 2000 series servers, four Silicon Graphics Onyx2 visualization systems, and 167 Octane workstations.

Special challenges — realistic flowing hair and follicles, the physics of how cloth wrinkles and drapes as the body wearing the fabric moves, the fluidity… read more

The man behind the Google brain: Andrew Ng and the quest for the new AI

May 9, 2013

Artificial.intelligence

There’s a theory that human intelligence stems from a single algorithm.

The idea arises from experiments suggesting that the portion of your brain dedicated to processing sound from your ears could also handle sight for your eyes. This is possible only while your brain is in the earliest stages of development, but it implies that the brain is — at its core — a general-purpose machine that can be tuned… read more

close and return to Home